Have you cleaned your ear yet?

December 22, 2012 at 2:53 pm 1 comment

 

Often in the urban jungles, the voices of birds get muffled by the sounds of cranes (machine) and noise pollution. In such a scenario, how can we ‘listen’ to the voices of nature?

There are some scientists who are working on acoustic ecology to bring out these nature sounds for people. Apart from scientists, even musicians are making an attempt to revive nature sounds, like Troels Folmann, who is trying to raise awareness about music with bumblebees.

Acoustic Ecology is a term coined in the early 1970s, emerging largely from the School of Communication at Simon Fraser University in Burnaby, British Columbia. The writings of R. Murray Schafer, most notably A Sound Education and The Tuning of the World (reissued asThe Soundscape), have provided a foundation from which several distinct yet related threads have grown.

Prominent themes in acoustic ecology today are:

  • The effect of soundscapes on humans, in cities, nature, and buildings, including urban planning and architectural design that takes sound into account.
  • Ways to become more aware of the sounds we are making, so we can make these choices more consciously.
  • Reflection on the soundscapes we encounter day to day.
  • The effects of human sounds on wildlife.
  • The “right to quiet,” which comes into play in wild lands recreation debates about motorized use, as well as in urban settings.
  • The idea of acoustic windows or acoustic niches, employed by various species in a given habitat to avoid masking each other’s vocalizations.

Source: http://www.acousticecology.org

Some researchers are attempting to find how people react to different sounds and how various sounds in daily lives impact them.

In the world that we live today, sounds of nature can actually heal us. Are you listening?

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1 Comment Add your own

  • 1. Shaun  |  February 13, 2013 at 12:08 am

    For my second year project at university I studied how the biodiversity of birds changed as you moved from an urbanised area to a rural setting and even with city parks and gardens there was a sharp increase in differing bird call as soon as the city border was reached

    Reply

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